Demystifying “Open Interest” and Securities in “Ban Period”

Demystifying “Open Interest” and Securities in “Ban Period”

What is open interest? Whenever you want to buy a Future/Option contract, there needs to be a seller. The buyer buys with the assumption that the contract price would go up and the seller sells with the assumption that the contract price would go down. When a trade happens between the buyer & the seller, there’s one ‘Open Contract‘ that comes into being and the quantity of these open contracts is referred to as ‘Open Interest‘. Thus Open Interest is the total number of outstanding contracts that are held by market participants at the end of the day. Open interest applies only to the futures/options segment. Open interest, or the total number of open contracts on a security, is often used to confirm trends and trend reversals for futures and options contracts. A common misconception is that open interest is the same thing as volume of futures and options trades. This is not correct, as demonstrated in the following example: Open Interest On January 1, A buys an option, which leaves an open interest and also creates trading volume of 1. On January 2, C and D create trading volume of 5 and there are also five more options left open. On January 3, A takes an offsetting position, open interest is reduced by 1 and trading volume is 1. On January 4, E simply replaces C and open interest does not change, trading volume increases by 5. Benefits of monitoring open interest By monitoring the changes in the open interest figures at the end of each trading day, some conclusions about the day’s activity can be drawn. Increasing...